Torrington poet’s poem selected for CT Bard’s Poetry Review

TORRINGTON — Local writer Patricia Mason-Martin has had one of her poems selected for publication in the upcoming anthology, The Connecticut Bards Poetry Review, according to a statement.

The new collection is published by Local Gems press of Long Island, which has published poets from more than 10 countries and 30 different states. Mason-Martin’s poem accepted for publication in The Connecticut Bards Poetry Review is “The End of the World”.

Originally from Darien, Mason-Martin resides in Torrington. A freelance writer, poet/performer and editor, she was the creator and host of SpeakEasy, a monthly poetry/spoken word series held the first Sunday of each month at Noelke Gallery in Torrington until the COVID pandemic. Author of six non-fiction books, Mason-Martin’s debut collection of poetry, In Venice I Could Sing, was published in the spring of 2021 and is available on Amazon and the writer’s website www.patriciamartin.com .

Mason-Martin’s poetry has appeared in various anthologies and magazines, including Poets to Come, an Anthology Celebrating Walt Whitman’s 200th Birthday; Twin Towers, Twin Decades: Poetry for Nine Eleven’s Twentieth Anniversary; Fired! Creative expression for difficult times; Trees in an Ash Garden: Poetry of Resilience; A path to dreams; Goddess: Raising consciousness through speech; WaterWrites: A Hudson River Anthology; Unlocking the Word: An Anthology of Found Poetry; Journal of Art Times; Chatham magazine; and EPIC magazine.

“While I enjoy researching and writing non-fiction as well as writing content for freelance clients, I find creating poetry to be a most rewarding personal expression,” Mason-Martin said. “I am honored to have my poem among those of some of Connecticut’s finest poets in the new anthology.”


For more information on Patricia Mason-Martin, visit www.patriciamartin.com

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