Rewards stimulate creatives to carry out their projects

Kane Parsons' next project is The Legend of Okatia and how she shaped Te Āpiti, the gorge of Manawatū.  Son Kippy Hehir-Parsons, 4, was present when he performed a previous play for Te Marae o Hine / The Square.

WARWICK SMITH / Stuff

Kane Parsons’ next project is The Legend of Okatia and how she shaped Te Āpiti, the gorge of Manawatū. Son Kippy Hehir-Parsons, 4, was present when he performed a previous play for Te Marae o Hine / The Square.

Palmerston North musician and songwriter Kane Parsons is this year’s biggest winner of the Earle Creativity and Development Trust Awards.

He was awarded $ 16,400 to compose a bicultural orchestral work based on The Legend of Okatia and how it shaped Te Āpiti, the throat of Manawatū.

Parsons said he wanted to work with Toi Warbrick and other artists to help bring the legend to life in music.

The 2021 awards come from a trust created by Dick Earle and his late wife, Mary, to encourage a range of creative endeavors.

READ MORE:
* Memory Lane: A marriage of two worlds
* Artist Warren Warbrick embraces the tools, toil and stamp of the past
* $ 100,000 in grants to encourage creativity in Manawatu

Earle said people with big ideas have often faced the hurdle of finding resources to get their jobs done, and trust has been built to bridge that gap.

The awards were designed not only to benefit the recipients, but the entire community who would be stimulated and enriched by the results, he said.

In total, 14 projects received nearly $ 100,000 to support creative efforts over the following year.

The history and literature scholarships were as follows:

  • Marilyn Wightman, $ 5,000 for a book on historic Feilding homes, Homes of the Feilding families.
  • Richard Mays, $ 5,000 for Palmy Poetry, to compile an anthology of poems on Palmerston North.
  • Tim Upperton, $ 7,500 for Horses without rider, to write a book of poems.
  • Rachel Doré, $ 5,130 to complete a novel, A respectable veneer, about a woman moving to Palmerston North and trying to fit in, set in the 1950s.
  • Carly Thomas, $ 6,500 for Before I forget: stories from Manawatū and Rangitīkei, a series of interviews with older members of the community.
  • Miriam Sharland, $ 5,000 for The heart stopped, an eco-biography born out of her experience as a homesick immigrant in Palmerston North locked out to get to know the scenery.
  • Dorian Wilson, $ 5,270 to study the history of commemorating people at Terrace End Cemetery.
  • Eljon Fitzgerald, $ 7,650 for Te Matatini ki Rangitane 2005-2007, a book on the importance of welcoming the rebirth of New Zealand’s kapa haka festivals.

The music scholarships were:

  • Jeff McNeil, Manawatū Youth Orchestra, $ 8,000 for an intensive workshop for strings and orchestral winds
  • Manawatū Youth for Music Trust, $ 5,000, for a composer in residence to compose for mixed abilities.
  • Guy Broadley, Renaissance Singers, $ 5,400 for a new collaboration, When Choir and Percussion Meet.
  • Kathy Clark, $ 5,400, for a youth music camp, the Gumboots Brass and Wind ensemble.
  • Shellie Hanley, $ 7,000 for Te Huia, an audio visual portrait.

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