Literature Prizes – River And Sound Review http://riverandsoundreview.org/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 08:12:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://riverandsoundreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/river-and-sound-review-icon-150x150.png Literature Prizes – River And Sound Review http://riverandsoundreview.org/ 32 32 My book is about the death of the longing for coexistence in India: Anuradha Roy https://riverandsoundreview.org/my-book-is-about-the-death-of-the-longing-for-coexistence-in-india-anuradha-roy/ https://riverandsoundreview.org/my-book-is-about-the-death-of-the-longing-for-coexistence-in-india-anuradha-roy/#respond Sat, 25 Sep 2021 08:12:07 +0000 https://riverandsoundreview.org/my-book-is-about-the-death-of-the-longing-for-coexistence-in-india-anuradha-roy/

There may never have been harmony, but the aspiration was coexistence, explains author Anuradha Roy who mourns the death of this ideal in her latest book “The Earthspinner” which delves into the heartbreaking history of a potter and his dream project – a terracotta horse.

Elango the village potter was ready for all the great things in life with this horse for which there were many takers. Then appeared strokes of Urdu calligraphy on it and whispers of her interfaith affair with Zohra, and in the blink of an eye her creation was destroyed and her perfect world turned into a nightmare. That was the problem with religion: it could lead to a kind of madness. Muslims and Hindus – it was not so much a question of religion as a vendetta like ‘Romeo and Juliet’ ”, remarks a character in“ The Earthspinner ”.

“Especially for people of my generation and older, I think, we miss a faded country where harmony between very diverse people was at least an ideal we aspired to. There has never been harmony, and there have always been oppressed, brutalized and excluded people, but despite everything, the aspiration was coexistence. In that sense, the book is about the death of that ideal, ” Roy told PTI in an email interview.

Published by Hachette India, “The Earthspinner” is the story of the new ways of “living and loving” in the modern world and the death of the aspiration for coexistence in India.

” I want to write a fiction that responds to my present, to everything I see around me, but which tries to find its links with the larger world and with the past. ‘The Earthspinner’ in the title of this book refers to the Creator – god, who is portrayed as a potter, across religions, ” said Roy, who has dabbled in pottery since his college days. “The way the Creator created the earth, which is destroyed by human action, the beautiful creation of Elango the Potter is also destroyed by human action,” she added.

Set in the 1980s, the 223-page novel chronicles Elango’s passion for creating a terra-cotta horse, destroyed by a community driven by “an incendiary passion of a different kind”, his love for Zohra and his dog Tashi. It is narrated by Sara, who studies English Literature in England and enjoys spending time throwing wheels, something she learned from Elango as a child.

Sara’s personal history, like that of her guardian, is also one of multiple losses – the loss of her father, Elango as a teacher, and the land in which she was born and raised.

Roy, 54, author of “The Atlas of Impossible Desire”, “The Folded Earth” and “All the Lives We Never Lived” and “Sleeping on Jupiter” , said his latest book was in the works for a long time. She said she explored her themes by writing shorter pieces – some of which have been released and others remain as notes.

” Sleeping on Jupiter ” was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize (2015) and won the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature (2016). Her latest book ‘All the Lives We Never Lived’ won Tata Literature Live! Book of the Year Award (2018).

The rewards are appreciated because they are ” decided by peers ” but are also ” very hit and miss ” with ” deserving books ” often missed, she argued.

I think it’s a little unfortunate how obsessed we have become with prices – the bottom line is that books that haven’t hit them can just fall off the reading card, and that’s a tragedy. What we need is to rediscover the pleasure of reading a book which may not have won any prize but which takes you into its world, invades your mind and heart so much that it modifies somewhat your way of seeing things and you have a hard time starting another book afterwards. ” When asked if the COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdowns that followed resulted in a collapse in creativity, the author who lives in a quiet cantonment town of Ranikhet in Uttarakhand replied in the negative.

When the pandemic started, I was already quite advanced in his writing, and when I write, I lead an even more isolated life than usual. The blockages have therefore not affected anything in this sense. As the pandemic escalated, anxiety for friends and relatives made it difficult to concentrate. Still, I was grateful that I had something else to focus on, so I didn’t give in to a feeling of helpless panic, ” she said.

Roy also detailed his writing process.

She emphasizes ‘phrase music’ and ‘well-structured prose, strained with meaning, poetry, wit, imagery’ and will continue to ‘revise and revise, every sentence’ ‘until she’s happy with the way it falls on her ears – also why she enjoys listening to the book read aloud multiple times. It’s different for me with every book, and every time I feel like I’m on the edge of a precipice and I feel fear and dizziness as well as fascination. If I’m completely engrossed in ideas and images that keep me going, then I know I’ll be back at work, writing. I’m not the type of person who writes a certain number of words even in a journal, no matter what, ”she explained.

” The Earthspinner ” was released on September 3.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Collection of stories And Softly Go The Crossings tops Singapore Book Awards, Arts News & Top Stories https://riverandsoundreview.org/collection-of-stories-and-softly-go-the-crossings-tops-singapore-book-awards-arts-news-top-stories/ https://riverandsoundreview.org/collection-of-stories-and-softly-go-the-crossings-tops-singapore-book-awards-arts-news-top-stories/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 12:50:00 +0000 https://riverandsoundreview.org/collection-of-stories-and-softly-go-the-crossings-tops-singapore-book-awards-arts-news-top-stories/

SINGAPORE – The short story collection And Softly Go The Crossings made an impact at the Singapore Book Awards on Friday, September 24.

Danielle Lim’s collection won the highest honor, Book of the Year, at the annual industry awards presented by the Singapore Book Publishers Association (SBPA).

The seventh edition of the awards, which recognizes the best in local book publishing, took place as a hybrid event, both in person at Jurong City Hall and live online.

Lim, 47, co-won the Singapore Literature Prize for English non-fiction in 2016 for her memoir The Sound Of Sch and was previously shortlisted for the Singapore Book Awards for her 2018 novel Trafalgar Sunrise.

And Softly Go The Crossings, which also won the award for best literary work, examines change and healing, from a man caring for his dying father to a laid-off middle-aged worker trying to reinvent himself in life. new careers.

Lim, a polytechnic teacher, said she had hoped to win in the Literary Work category, but did not expect her silent book to win the title of Book of the Year.

“During this pandemic and with the climate crisis and so on, I think it’s really important for us to be more attentive to the changes, especially the invisible changes that are happening in the mind,” he said. she declared.

“There is nothing special, nothing out of the ordinary about the characters. But there is a lot of beauty and pain and also healing that we don’t see, and I think we don’t recognize it enough.

“These stories are dedicated to ordinary people who are trying to find a way to overcome their difficulties.”

In a statement, the Book of the Year jury said: “The problems, trials and tribulations, joys and sorrows told in the stories are relevant in today’s changing world and will be read for years to come. years to come.”

The panel consisted of former SBPA chairperson Triena Ong, Michelle Wang, assistant professor at Nanyang Technological University, and Ms. Suporn Arriwong, deputy head of English language selection at the National Library Board.

They also awarded an honorary mention to Denise Fletcher’s voluminous cookbook, How to Cook Everything Singaporean, which won the title of best illustrated non-fiction.

Denise Fletcher’s How To Cook Everything Singapore won the title for Best Illustrated Non-Fiction. PHOTO: DENISE FLETCHER

There is traditionally no shortlist for the Book of the Year category, which is judged by a separate jury once the other awards are decided. Winning titles from other categories, as well as independent submissions, will be considered.

Ten titles, chosen from 38 finalists, scored victories during the ceremony.

Lives & times of hrh – the memoir of retired civil servant Herman Ronald Hochstadt – won the title of best non-fiction, while the title of best youngster went to popular children’s book Sherlock Sam And The Seafaring Scourge On Sentosa by husband and wife duo AJ Low.


Lives & times of hrh won the title of best non-fiction and Sherlock Sam And The Seafaring Scourge On Sentosa won the title of best youngster. PHOTOS: NUS PRESS, EPIGRAMBOOKSHOP.SG

Best Audiobook, one of a few new categories introduced only last year, went to Storytel Singapore’s Impractical Uses Of Cake, based on the novel by Epigram Books Fiction award-winning Yeoh Jo-Ann, narrated by Joshua Lim .

To qualify for the prizes, books must be published in one of Singapore’s four official languages ​​between January 1 and December 31 of the previous year.

They must have a Singapore International Standard Book Number, a unique number that identifies each edition of a book, with hard copies legally filed with the NLB. Books sold in print must be sold in local and / or overseas retail stores.

The winners, who were chosen by a jury of writers, academics and other industry insiders, received a plaque and certificate of recognition.

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Shooter kills 1 himself in US supermarket, 12 injured https://riverandsoundreview.org/shooter-kills-1-himself-in-us-supermarket-12-injured/ https://riverandsoundreview.org/shooter-kills-1-himself-in-us-supermarket-12-injured/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 04:36:04 +0000 https://riverandsoundreview.org/shooter-kills-1-himself-in-us-supermarket-12-injured/ Emergency personnel respond to a shooting at a Kroger supermarket in suburb of Memphis, Tennessee, United States on September 23, 2021. Photo: Reuters A …]]>

Emergency personnel respond to a shooting at a Kroger supermarket in suburb of Memphis, Tennessee, United States on September 23, 2021. Photo: Reuters

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Emergency personnel respond to a shooting at a Kroger supermarket in suburb of Memphis, Tennessee, United States on September 23, 2021. Photo: Reuters

A gunman killed one, injured 12, and then apparently committed suicide in a Tennessee supermarket on Thursday, chasing panicked shoppers and employees as they fled the aisles as some took refuge in freezers in stores. stores, police said.

Of the 12 injured, one was in surgery and another in intensive care after the shooting in the Memphis suburb of Collierville, Police Chief Dale Lane told reporters. A 13th person was treated for an anxiety attack, he said.

Police arrived at the scene almost immediately after the shooting at the Kroger grocery store in Collierville, a town of about 50,000 people about 30 miles (50 km) east of Memphis, in southwest Tennessee. .

“We found people hiding in freezers and in locked offices. They were doing what they were trained to do – run, hide, fight,” Lane told reporters, calling gun violence “l most horrific event to have happened in the history of Collierville “. “

Lane withheld information about the shooter as investigators tried to determine if anyone else had assisted him in the attack, although he said there was no evidence of terrorism.

WREG-TV reported that the shooter was an employee who was fired on Thursday, citing an anonymous police source.

Brignetta Dickerson, a Kroger employee, told WREG she asked her fellow employees and customers when the shooting broke out to follow her to the back of the store and close the door behind them, but the gunman followed. .

“He continued to shoot and shoot and shoot. He shot one of my colleagues in the head and then one of the clients in the stomach,” Dickerson said, adding that the shooter appeared to have a rifle. military style.

“I’m a little fragile but I’m fine. I have God on my side,” Dickerson said.

There were 44 employees and an unknown number of customers in the store when the shooting broke out, Lane said.

Thursday’s violence was the latest in a series of deadly workplace shootings that have erupted in U.S. cities, killing dozens and injuring many this year.

Ten people were killed in March when a gunman opened fire on a King Soopers supermarket owned by Kroger Co in Boulder, Colorado.

Kroger’s spokeswoman Teresa Dickerson said the Collierville store would be closed until further notice.

“It’s an emotional roller coaster, as you can imagine,” Dickerson told reporters. “And we, of course, have provided guidance to every associate, who is here today, and we will continue to do so.”

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Nobel Prize ceremonies to be shortened and prizes awarded in home countries of laureates due to COVID-19 https://riverandsoundreview.org/nobel-prize-ceremonies-to-be-shortened-and-prizes-awarded-in-home-countries-of-laureates-due-to-covid-19/ https://riverandsoundreview.org/nobel-prize-ceremonies-to-be-shortened-and-prizes-awarded-in-home-countries-of-laureates-due-to-covid-19/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 12:16:05 +0000 https://riverandsoundreview.org/nobel-prize-ceremonies-to-be-shortened-and-prizes-awarded-in-home-countries-of-laureates-due-to-covid-19/

Nobel Prize ceremonies will be restricted and reduced for the second year in a row due to the coronavirus pandemic, the foundation behind the coveted prizes said Thursday.

This year’s prize winners in chemistry, literature, physics, medicine and economics, as well as the Nobel Peace Prize, will be announced between October 4 and 11.

“It is now also clear that this year’s Nobel festivities in December – when the winners will be honored in Stockholm and Oslo – will be a mix of digital and physical events,” said the Nobel Foundation.

The winners will receive their Nobel Prize medals and diplomas in their home country, the foundation said. He said the presentation events will be linked to an award ceremony at Stockholm City Hall on December 10, the anniversary of the death of founder Albert Nobel. The Peace Prize is awarded in Oslo, Norway, because Nobel wanted it that way for reasons he kept to himself.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee is keeping open the possibility of hosting the Nobel Peace Prize winner (s) in Oslo, the foundation said. The committee plans to announce the format of its festivities in mid-October.

“I think everyone would like the COVID-19 pandemic to be over, but we’re not there yet,” Vidar Helgesen, executive director of the Nobel Foundation, said in a statement.

“Uncertainty about the course of the pandemic and the possibilities of international travel is the reason why the 2021 laureates will receive their medals and diplomas in their country of origin.” Helgesen said the foundation “looks forward to reaching even more people around the world using new digital formats and solutions.” “It is clear that in Stockholm and Sweden there will be less attention around the awards ceremony and the banquet, but overall we are trying to organize a very nice celebration of the winners,” he said. he told the Swedish news agency TT.

The pandemic has curtailed celebrations in honor of the 12 award winners named in 2020. No official banquet has been held to honor the award winners. Instead, their achievements have been recognized and awarded in low-key ceremonies in Europe and the United States.

Looking at the events of the past year, “some of the digital production has gained greater global reach than we’ve seen before,” Helgensen told TT.

A Nobel Prize comes with a cash reward of 10 million crowns ($ 1.15 million) – to be shared in some cases – of diplomas and gold medals.

The six prizes are awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, the Nobel Assembly of the Karolinska Institute, the Swedish Academy and the Norwegian Nobel Committee.

Posted on: Thursday September 23, 2021 5:46 PM IST Source link

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5 writers are shortlisted for the CBC Nonfiction Prize 2021 https://riverandsoundreview.org/5-writers-are-shortlisted-for-the-cbc-nonfiction-prize-2021/ https://riverandsoundreview.org/5-writers-are-shortlisted-for-the-cbc-nonfiction-prize-2021/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 15:14:38 +0000 https://riverandsoundreview.org/5-writers-are-shortlisted-for-the-cbc-nonfiction-prize-2021/

Five writers from across Canada made the 2021 CBC Nonfiction Award shortlist.

The finalists are:

The winner will be announced on September 29. He will receive $ 6,000 from Canada Council for the Arts and participate in a two-week writing residency at Banff Center for Arts and Creativity.

The remaining four finalists will each receive $ 1,000 from the Canada Council for the Arts.

The five finalists had their work published on Radio-Canada books. You can read their stories by clicking on the links above.

This year’s finalists were selected by a jury made up of Jenny Heijun Wills, MG Vassanji and Tim Cook. They will also select the winner.

The long list was compiled by a team of writers and editors from across Canada. There were over 2,000 submissions in English.

The list of finalists for the Francophone competition was also unveiled. To find out more, visit the Radio-Canada Story Award.

Last year’s winner was writer Jonathan Poh of Burnaby, BC for his story Values ​​Village.

If you are interested in other CBC Literary Awards, on 2022 New CBC Award is open for submissions until October 31, 2021.

The 2022 CBC Nonfiction Award will open in January and 2022 Radio-Canada Poetry Prize will open in April.

Know the 2021 CBC Nonfiction Award The English-speaking finalists below.

Alison Hughes is a writer and academic writing consultant living in Edmonton. (Samuel McInnes)

Alison Hughes has published 18 books, with translations into Korean, Dutch, Turkish and French. She was a finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award for children’s literature – text and won the Children’s Writing Award from the Writers’ Union of Canada and the R. Ross Annett Award from the Alberta Literary Awards. Her short fiction was shortlisted for the Writers Union’s Short Prose Competition for Developing Writers and shortlisted for the 2011 CBC Short Story Award. She graduated in English and Law, works as an academic writing consultant and editor, and is currently working on a novel of interconnected stories.

Why she wrote Funhouse mirrors: “I spent almost a year in chemotherapy after being diagnosed with cancer years ago. The chemotherapy unit was fascinating – a place where strangers bonded and veterans counseled newbies, where people cried and laughed and raged and chatted, alternately incredibly stoic and at their very lowest ebb.

It was full of expectations and assumptions.

“It was full of expectations and assumptions; sometimes it was as mundane as a Tim Hortons and other times it was filled with existential terror. This story covers a period of about 10 minutes of ‘interaction and observation one particular day I thought encapsulated some of these contradictions. “

Barbara Mackenzie is a writer living in Yellowknife. (Lani Cooke)

Barbara Mackenzie is retired and lives in a small houseboat on Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories. , director and executive secretary. She has written extensively through her work and has written three books. The most enduring and profound lessons she has learned relate to her deep symbiotic relationship with the earth.

I was inspired by those close-up observations of my surroundings necessary to survive in the powerful and at times difficult but still impressive North.

Why she wrote Northern Spring: “I was inspired by those close observations of my surroundings necessary to survive the powerful and sometimes difficult but always impressive North. This knowledge seems to require more than what my five senses and a limited English language can tell me, but the process of ‘trying to find the words is uplifting and inspiring. “

Chanel M. Sutherland is a writer and director of product marketing living in Montreal (Submitted by Chanel M. Sutherland)

Chanel M. Sutherland is a writer and director of product marketing living in Montreal. She was born in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and moved to Canada at the age of 10. She holds a BA in English Literature from Concordia University. She is currently working on a collection of interconnected short stories that explore the complex relationships and experiences of living in a small Caribbean village.

Why she wrote Umbrella: “The story comes from a lifetime of uncomfortable times when I remembered – whether with direct intentions or not – my“ otherness. ”As a black woman, racial microaggression is nothing new. for me, but somehow I’m still shocked when it happens. I tend to bypass those stray comments or behavior and bubble in silence. didn’t mean it that way “or” it’s just a harmless joke “.

I wanted to write a story that confronts racial microaggression head-on, removing the subtleties it often lurks behind.

“I wanted to write a story that confronts racial microaggression head-on by removing the subtleties it often hides behind. That’s why I chose to open with the line ‘Do you like being black?’ There is nothing secret about this statement, and some readers might find it shaking and uncomfortable, much like the victim of a racist act … with a football pitch crush. “

Lee Thomas is a therapist living in Fredericton. (Shilo McCavour)

Lee Thomas is a Fredericton-based private practice therapist. They hold an Honors Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of New Brunswick and a Masters of Clinical Social Work from the University of Calgary. They were shortlisted for the 2018 CBC Nonfiction Prize for True trans. They are peer support volunteers, bossy dog ​​parent, and occasional writer.

It wasn’t funny enough to tweet, so I wrote this instead.

Why they wrote My summer body: “When I came back to New Brunswick after graduating from graduate school, I had a series of extremely disappointing dates, even though I was at my peak. It wasn’t funny enough to tweet, so I wrote this instead. “

Sarah Van Goethem is a writer living in Bothwell, Ontario. (Kirsten Van Goethem)

Sarah Van Goethem was born in Chatham-Kent, Ontario. Her novels have appeared in PitchWars and have been shortlisted for the Bath Children’s Novel Award and the CANSCAIP Children’s Writing Competition. She also writes short stories, one of which was nominated for a Pushcart Award, many of which are published in anthologies. Sarah is a nature lover, dark forest wanderer and vintage picker. You can find her at auctions, thrift stores, and most definitely breaking into anything that is abandoned.

Why she wrote A borrowed husband: “Love. How messy and unpredictable love is and not always easy. I like to hide behind fiction, but my mother always insists that I write my story. After the death of my first husband, I spent the following year writing a journey through mourning that no one has ever seen. In doing so, I learned that the more we love, the more we suffer.

I learned that the more we love, the more we suffer.

“I avoided writing this story for a while, because I knew it would hurt. But in the end, it’s also a love story. Just a different story than most people imagine. . I wrote it to the first wife because it’s her story, too. Just like my late husband, she holds a piece of that story that we all share. “

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]]> https://riverandsoundreview.org/5-writers-are-shortlisted-for-the-cbc-nonfiction-prize-2021/feed/ 0 Chipping Campden Literature Festival to be Best Ever, Promises Artistic Director Vicky Bennett https://riverandsoundreview.org/chipping-campden-literature-festival-to-be-best-ever-promises-artistic-director-vicky-bennett/ https://riverandsoundreview.org/chipping-campden-literature-festival-to-be-best-ever-promises-artistic-director-vicky-bennett/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 16:19:06 +0000 https://riverandsoundreview.org/chipping-campden-literature-festival-to-be-best-ever-promises-artistic-director-vicky-bennett/

Described as the ‘little sister of the Cheltenham Literature Festival’, the illuminated Chipping Campden festival does even more weight when it comes to the city from September 20-25.

In addition to a host of big names from around the world, there will be open mic poetry and a festival book group with thriller writer Stuart Tourton.

Artistic Director Vicky Bennett promised, “2021 is our best program ever. So many months of virtual event lockdowns have led authors to fight for a spot at what is one of the nation’s premier live book festivals.

“Once again, we’re featuring writers who are at the top of their game. Our audiences are increasingly coming from further afield, which makes our festival national and even international. ‘

Marina Warner (50982122)

Some of the author’s highlights are:

Sir Jonathan Bate presents his parallel lives of Keats and Scott Fitzgerald.

Dame Marina Warner, whose mother is from Naples and the father was an English colonel, tells the story of their extraordinary marriage during WWII.

Sir Stanley Wells sheds new light on why Shakespeare wrote his sonnets.

Max Hastings (50982112)
Max Hastings (50982112)

Paula Byrne presents her latest biography The Adventures of Miss Barbara Pym. Max Hastings tells his gripping tale of a critical WWII naval battle, Operation Pedastal.

Palliative Care Doctor Rachel Clarke and Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist Gwen Adshead demonstrate the importance of compassion by sharing their experiences of working in different areas of the NHS.

Richard Fortey remembers how his childhood curiosity led to his career as a scientist. Top coach Owen Eastwood reveals how the Maori concept of belonging can build successful teams and in We Are Pilgrims, Victoria Preston explores our overriding urge to travel towards purpose, wonder and self-discovery.

Jonathan Bate (50982110)
Jonathan Bate (50982110)

Paul Mason, Ian Dunt, Luke Harding, Sathnam Sanghera, Dan Hicks and Corinne Fowler together cover the current rise of fascism, the need for liberalism, the influence of Putin’s Russia, the legacy of the Empire and the prevalence of racism.

Ian MacGregor’s Checkpoint Charlie marks the 60th anniversary of the construction of the Berlin Wall. Our 2021 books have been listed for awards, Sunday Times bestsellers, and four a Radio 4 book of the week.

online booking www.campdenlitfest.co.uk. Tickets cost £ 5 and are free for full-time students.



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Catholic Sabha Udupi Pradesh presents Francis Danti literary prize to Father Chethan Lobo https://riverandsoundreview.org/catholic-sabha-udupi-pradesh-presents-francis-danti-literary-prize-to-father-chethan-lobo/ https://riverandsoundreview.org/catholic-sabha-udupi-pradesh-presents-francis-danti-literary-prize-to-father-chethan-lobo/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 17:03:23 +0000 https://riverandsoundreview.org/catholic-sabha-udupi-pradesh-presents-francis-danti-literary-prize-to-father-chethan-lobo/


Catholic Sabha Udupi Pradesh presents Francis Danti literary prize to Father Chethan Lobo

Udupi: “It is sad to know that young people today neglect their Konkani mother tongue and prefer Western languages. They should use their mother tongue more and more in their daily life, ”said Father Stany B Lobo, Chancellor of the Diocese of Udupi and Pastor of the Church of Udyavar. He was speaking at the Annual General Meeting held for the year 2020-21, the Francis Danti Memorial Literature Award as well as the prize distribution function for the winners of the Denis D’Silva Memorial Essay Writing competition on September 19 .

Speaking further, Father Stany B Lobo said that Konkani, although being a beautiful language, has become a decorative language and is limited to religious services in churches. The Konkani language is losing its appeal among young people.

On this occasion, Fr. Chetan Lobo (OFM Cap), PRO of the Diocese of Udupi received the Francis Danti Literary Prize for his book “Chetana Chintana”. Dr Gerald Pinto introduced Fr Chetan Lobo to the assembly.

Prizes were awarded to the winners of the Essay Competition organized in memory of the late Denis D’Silva. Alphonse D’Costa read the names of the winners.

During the “Old Men’s Club” program, a satirical book written by Joseph Quadros and published by the Udupi diocesan bimonthly “Uzwaad” was published. Fr Royson Fernandes, editor-in-chief of ‘Uzwaad’ presented the writer and the book “Old Men’s Club” to the audience.

On behalf of the Catholic Sabha, a rich tribute was paid to the founding president of SC the late Oscar Fernandes. The former president of the Catholic Sabha, Alphonse D’Costa recalled the service rendered by the late Oscar Fernandes to the organization.

Mary D’Souza chaired the annual general meeting. The 2019-20 year report was presented by Co-Secretary Olivia D’Mello. The annual report for the year 2020-2021 was read by Secretary Gregory PK D’Souza. Treasurer Gerald Rodrigues presented the accounts and proposed the budget for the year 2021-22. Henry Menezes presented the Manasa report, Pamboor and the Sashakta Samudaya Trust report was presented by President Walter Cyril Pinto.

Father Ferdinand Gonsalves-Spiritual Director of Catholic Sabha, Robert Menezes-Past President, Valerian Fernandes-Former President, Presidents of Deaneries of Catholic Sabha-Lavina Pereira, Udupi, Leena Machado-Shirva, Louis D’Souza-Kallianpur, Mabel D ‘Souza-Kundapur and Soloman Alvares-Karkal were present.

President-elect Santosh Cornelio welcomed the assembly. Secretary Gregory D’Souza gave the vote of thanks and Mabel D’Souza anchored the program.

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Star-Times Sunday News Contest: More Prizes, New Categories, New Judges https://riverandsoundreview.org/star-times-sunday-news-contest-more-prizes-new-categories-new-judges/ https://riverandsoundreview.org/star-times-sunday-news-contest-more-prizes-new-categories-new-judges/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://riverandsoundreview.org/star-times-sunday-news-contest-more-prizes-new-categories-new-judges/

There is a chapter in Patricia Grace’s memoir where, while working as a teacher with her husband in Northland, she discovered the fellowship of a Penwomen’s Society, which held monthly writing contests.

Grace (Ngāti Toa, Ngāti Raukawa, Te Ati Āwa) has won the Maori news category every year, and she quickly caught the attention of Longman Paul editor-in-chief Phoebe Meikle who, sensing a gap in the literature New Zealand, searched for stories by Maori and Pasifika Writers. Grace’s first collection of short stories, Waiariki, was published in 1975, after which Grace remembers Meikle saying, “Now we want a novel from you. “

Grace writes From the center: a writer’s life, published this year, “When I am asked what inspires me most in my writing, the answer will always be ‘people’, ordinary people. “

READ MORE:
* Patricia Grace turns her pen on herself
* Writer’s “Artistic” Wins First Prize in Star-Times Sunday News Contest
* We all like to write short stories, but we don’t like paying to read them

Grace, 83, is the author of seven novels, including The cousins, which was recently adapted for cinema; seven short story books, several children’s and non-fiction books, and the winner of dozens of accolades – too many to list, but including an honorary doctorate and multiple NZ Book Awards.

She was named a Distinguished Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit and shortlisted for the Booker Prize. A strong waha on the New Zealand literary scene, she campaigned for depictions of Maori, especially in children’s books.

Now Grace is the newest judge in the long run Sunday Star-Times Price of the news. Grace will judge a new category introduced for Emerging Maori Writers, alongside author Amy McDaid who will judge Best Emerging Writer Pasifika, and judges for the Open Category Rosetta Allan, and Megan Dunn.

With the support of new sponsor Milford Foundation and existing sponsor Penguin Random House New Zealand, the $ 9,000 prize pool is bigger than ever. Previous winners are novelists Kirsten McDougall, Eleanor Catton and Carl Nixon.

“I’m looking for a short story to get me interested from the first few sentences, that will deliver some kind of promise of what’s going to happen, and to see the development from there,” Grace says.

“The story might take a certain tangent, but always come back to this common thread of what I expected, or maybe, I did not expect. Coming to some sort of conclusion, which doesn’t have to be all the threads tied together, can be left up in the air.

“It will have some impact. And, good language used in a good way, good pictures, and hopefully that avoids clichés – those things that get you to write a bit. “

Amy McDaid says she’ll be looking for something original that “surprises me in a way. The power of the short story lies in its economy: every paragraph, every sentence, every detail works on the big picture – building the character, developing the frame, the story.

“The impact of a short story isn’t in a lesson for the reader at the end – it’s about the journey and its impact on the reader along the way.

“I want a story that makes me feel something – whether it makes me laugh, moves me, or challenges me with an unusual or different perspective. The start must be strong, I must want to read these first lines. While the ending doesn’t need to be tied tightly, it can leave questions. “

New Zealand author and Sunday Star-Times news judge Amy McDaid.

Colleen Maria Lenihan

New Zealand author and Sunday Star-Times news judge Amy McDaid.

In Of the Center, Grace writes that she “never found herself in a book. Books (for children) still represented a lot of the Pakeha nuclear family. And what about the representations that were there? Grace notes the prejudices and untruths: the colonizers were pioneers, the Maori were barbarians.

Grace’s first novel, Mutuwhenua, published in 1978, follows the story of Ripeka, who leaves her extended whanau to marry a professor Pakeha. Grace’s own father had told his family the story of telling his whanau that he was marrying a Pakeha woman. Sylvia Plath once said that everything in life is writable, if you have the courage to do it.

“It was never my goal to hurt people or expose people unnecessarily,” Grace says, when asked how to delicately blend fact and fiction. “But there is usually a way to write about something, difficult aspects.

“What I’ve always wanted to focus on is the positive side of Maori life. Not in all cases, but there is enough negativity through the media or whatever, so I wanted to picture us going about our ordinary daily life, because in functional communities and functional houses, this is not. never broadcast otherwise.

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Cousins ​​is currently showing in New Zealand cinemas.

Over 40 years after Grace’s first book, how much has the Maori representation in literature evolved? “It’s slowly changing,” she said over the phone. Thing was supposed to meet Grace near her home in Kapiti when Lockdown Level 4 went into effect. Grace seems unfazed (“Kaptiti is a nice place to live”). Her son bought her a Kindle during the last confinement. It’s a lot easier to get books now, and the Kindle offers a softer landing when it falls asleep in the middle of the page.

“I think publishers are looking for writers from different backgrounds,” Grace continues. “While there has always been this resistance – there is a long way to go before this stops happening – there is a lot more awareness of other languages, other cultures, and I think it is. a good thing.

“When I started … we didn’t have college-type young people, or people of any age, who were Maori critical of Maori work, by Maori, and so sometimes our work met a different understanding. of ourselves. Now we have a lot of writers who come from the culture who can critique and give opinions and so on. It’s a very big difference, welcome.

As the quintessential literary advice says, reading is the key to being a good writer. Grace reads every night, quite often in the early morning hours. “I’m a little insomniac… (I) wake up at two in the morning and read for a few hours and go back to sleep. Otherwise, I only read during lunch.

She counts local writer Becky Manawatu (Auē) among her favorites, and she has read Amitav Ghosh and Rohinton Mistry. During her early years of writing she was inspired by Janet Frame, Frank Sargeson, Maurice Shadbolt, Ian Cross, and Witi Ihimaera.

Writing Mutuwhenua was a learning curve for Grace, like every piece of news. But she trusted the process, and every writing job was an opportunity to learn and improve. She fights against the writer’s block by “simply continuing to move forward”. Grace laughs. “Although I know what I’m writing is probably rubbish.”

The same goes for others: “Keep working on it. Decide that you won’t be stuck. A good way not to get stuck is to leave what you do at the end of the day at a climax – in the middle of a paragraph, or something like that, so you can easily pick up in the morning, so that you know what you’re doing there.

Grace’s other secret? Pencil and paper. “I find that ideas flow better for me when I just write by hand in a notebook. Every once in a while I want to work on a piece of paper, and it’s not an outline or anything, but just a paragraph or even a chapter, which I can’t seem to grasp. It’s like brainstorming, I guess. Finally, she throws the paper away.

The administrator of the Milford Foundation, Sarah Norrie.

Provided

The administrator of the Milford Foundation, Sarah Norrie.

Welcome to our new sponsor

Milford Foundation administrator Sarah Norrie said the foundation was delighted to help support this long-standing news contest. The Foundation’s goal is to invest in the future of Aotearoa in New Zealand and to create opportunities for new generations.

“New Zealand’s essential workers are rightly in the spotlight right now for the vital work they do for all of us. We believe our writers and storytellers are essential in their own way – imagine life without them! It is all to the credit of Sunday Star-Times that his competition has already helped launch the careers of many admired writers.

“The short story is a difficult form, but proves that something deep and lasting can be said in relatively few words.

“We can’t wait to see what these writers come up with and help support their storytelling. Their stories deserve a broad and supportive audience and all of us at the Milford Foundation are very happy to support this. “

Pengin editor-in-chief Harriet Allan.

Provided by Harriet Allan

Pengin editor-in-chief Harriet Allan.

Penguin Random House New Zealand publisher and sponsor Harriet Allan said that in a world of restricted movement, a short story can get you through closed doors, across borders, back in time, to another planet, another existence or in the future.

“You are only limited by your imagination. And even if you feel isolated, maybe you even had to isolate yourself, a story can allow you to connect with countless people in a unique and powerful way. Thanks to the story that you can touch, kiss or fight with others, you can remove your mask or put on countless new ones. “

Don’t you think you have a story in you?

“Start with a single sentence,” says Allan. “Follow this phrase, or fight with it, or consider its opposite. You could put it in a stranger’s mouth and find out who that stranger is. You can put an ordinary sentence in an extraordinary setting, or a weird line in a mundane world.

“As a child, you probably took a single block or piece of plasticine or plasticine on a regular basis and you created a whole universe: this initial sequence of words is also your starting point for doing whatever you want. You can even decide to rewrite or delete that first line once you get back to editing. When you get to that point, you’ll find it’s become a story.

Kirsten McDougall won the Sunday Star-Times News Contest in 2020.

MONIQUE FORD / Stuff

Kirsten McDougall won the Sunday Star-Times News Contest in 2020.

How to enter

Authors can participate by clicking on the link below. The winners will be announced at the end of November. There is a $ 9,000 prize pool, including $ 1,000 each for emerging Maori and Pasifika writers (who are also eligible to win the open category, valued at $ 6,000), and category winners less 25 years old. The winning stories will be published in the Sunday Star-Times and Stuff. More details, including word length and terms and conditions, can be found here.

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Doerr, Powers on long list of fiction for National Book Awards https://riverandsoundreview.org/doerr-powers-on-long-list-of-fiction-for-national-book-awards/ https://riverandsoundreview.org/doerr-powers-on-long-list-of-fiction-for-national-book-awards/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 14:15:14 +0000 https://riverandsoundreview.org/doerr-powers-on-long-list-of-fiction-for-national-book-awards/

NEW YORK (AP) – Anthony Doerr, Richard Powers and Lauren Groff are among this year’s nominees for the National Book Awards fictional list, which also includes Honorée Fanonne Jeffers’ epic debut novel “The Love Songs of WEB Du Bois “, already an Oprah Winfrey Selection and finalist for the Kirkus Prize.

Doerr’s “Cloud Cuckoo Land” is her first novel since her Pulitzer Prize “All the Light We Cannot See” and Powers’ “Bewilderment” is her first book since Pulitzer won “The Overstory.” Groff’s “Matrix” is his third consecutive work to receive a National Book Award nomination, following “Fates and Furies” and the “Florida” collection of stories.

Other works cited Friday by the National Book Foundation are “Abundance” by Jakob Guanzon, “Zorrie” by Laird Hunt, “The Prophets” by Robert Jones, Jr., “Intimacies” by Katie Kitamura, “The Souvenir Museum: Stories” by Elizabeth McCracken and “Hell of a Book” by Jason Mott.

Judges also ignored some notable 2021 dramas, including Colson Whitehead’s “Harlem Shuffle,” Jonathan Franzen’s “Crossroads” and two Booker Prize finalists: “No One Is Talking About This” by Patricia Lockwood and “Great Circle” by Maggie Shipstead.

The foundation this week published 10 lists in five competitive categories: fiction, non-fiction, poetry, translation and children’s literature. The award judges will narrow the lists on October 5 and the winners, who will each receive $ 10,000, will be announced on November 17 at a ceremony in Manhattan. The foundation plans to present the awards in person after hosting a virtual event in 2020 due to the pandemic.

Two honorary National Book Awards have already been announced: playwright Karen Tei Yamashita for her distinguished contribution to American literature and author-librarian Nancy Pearl for her outstanding service to the American literary community.

The awards, created in 1950 and long presented by the nonprofit Book Foundation, are chosen by juries of five that include authors, critics and other members of the literary community. The judges in each category evaluated hundreds of works before deciding on the long lists.

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A full list of nominees is available at https://www.nationalbook.org/awards-prizes/national-book-awards-2021/

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Doerr, Powers on long list of fiction for National Book Awards | Books https://riverandsoundreview.org/doerr-powers-on-long-list-of-fiction-for-national-book-awards-books/ https://riverandsoundreview.org/doerr-powers-on-long-list-of-fiction-for-national-book-awards-books/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 14:15:00 +0000 https://riverandsoundreview.org/doerr-powers-on-long-list-of-fiction-for-national-book-awards-books/





This photo combination shows eight of the ten nominees on the National Book Awards drama list, top row from left, Anthony Doerr’s “Cloud Cuckoo Land,” Lauren Groff’s “Matrix,” Laird’s “Zorrie” Hunt, Robert Jones, Jr. ‘ s “The Prophets,” bottom row from left, “Intimacies” by Katie Kitamura, “The Souvenir Museum” by Elizabeth McCracken, “Hell of a Book” by Jason Mott and “Bewilderment” by Richard Powers (Scribner / Riverhead / Bloomsbury / GP Putnam’s Sons / Riverhead / Ecco / Dutton / WW Norton via AP)


HONS


By HILLEL ITALY national writer AP

NEW YORK (AP) – Anthony Doerr, Richard Powers and Lauren Groff are among this year’s nominees for the National Book Awards fictional list, which also includes Honorée Fanonne Jeffers’ epic debut novel “The Love Songs of WEB Du Bois “, already an Oprah Winfrey Selection and finalist for the Kirkus Prize.

Doerr’s “Cloud Cuckoo Land” is her first novel since her Pulitzer Prize “All the Light We Cannot See” and Powers’ “Bewilderment” is her first book since Pulitzer won “The Overstory.” Groff’s “Matrix” is his third consecutive work to receive a National Book Award nomination, following “Fates and Furies” and the “Florida” collection of stories.

Other works cited Friday by the National Book Foundation are “Abundance” by Jakob Guanzon, “Zorrie” by Laird Hunt, “The Prophets” by Robert Jones, Jr., “Intimacies” by Katie Kitamura, “The Souvenir Museum: Stories” by Elizabeth McCracken and “Hell of a Book” by Jason Mott.

Judges also ignored some notable 2021 dramas, including Colson Whitehead’s “Harlem Shuffle,” Jonathan Franzen’s “Crossroads” and two Booker Prize finalists: “No One Is Talking About This” by Patricia Lockwood and “Great Circle” by Maggie Shipstead.

The foundation this week published 10 lists in five competitive categories: fiction, non-fiction, poetry, translation and children’s literature. The award judges will narrow the lists on October 5 and the winners, who will each receive $ 10,000, will be announced on November 17 at a ceremony in Manhattan. The foundation plans to present the awards in person after hosting a virtual event in 2020 due to the pandemic.

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